The Village Dragon

Nearly every non-magical village, town, or city has at least one resident dragon. Frankly, it is just good civic business. Come winter, the local dragon can be hired to clean out snow and ice with its fiery breath, and come times of invading knights and rowdy adventurers, the creature’s claws and teeth make short work of any enemy.

Magic attracts magic, so in a village scarce with monsters or the undead, having a dragon around can help bring in the energies that assist in keeping life in the Netherworld so comfortable. In this manner, dragons and their lairs provide anchors, drawing in and concentrating everything from storm energy to stone and earth powers.

Tourism helps boost local economies immensely, and monsters travel all across the Netherworld to meet specific dragons, trading gems and gold for discarded scales, to ask advice, and to hear historical accounts.

A DRAGON RELAXES ON ITS HOARD and listens INTENTLY TO A STORY ABOUT CATS.

Now, one might wonder what the dragons could possibly get out of this arrangement. Treasure (as mentioned) and attention.

Dragon hoards serve as bank reserves for a community, giving them a standard for their economy and a base for trade with other communities. Many individuals bank with dragons directly as well, adding their personal and family wealth to the creature’s hoard with the assurance there is hardly a safer place to store money.

For all their brooding bluster and bluff, most dragons love attention. They love being admired for their size and wisdom, they adore having their scales polished and delight in showing off their magical abilities. By setting up their homes in largely non-magical communities, they instantly become “the big show” of the region. Everyone visits often, usually with food to share.

With their incredibly long lives, dragons watch generation after generation enter the world, prosper, and then find peace. The dragon can add new chapters to stories and relive past memories as family friends.

Interacting with dragons is easy as long as you follow a few simple rules: know you cannot hurt it, and if you try, it will eat you, and it will hurt tremendously the entire time. Bring snacks to share (any will do) and offer it some piece of news about your life, local gossip,
or bring a story you’ve thought up.